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Usability Interview: Jake Rocheleau

Posted by Jacob Creech on September 27th, 2011

Following on from our Interview with Jon Phillips of JonPhillips.ca, this time around we’ve got an interview with Jake Rocheleau.

Jake is a very prolific blogger (as a quick Google search will show), and his writing has been featured on a number of popular sites, including Speckyboy, WebDesignLedger, FreelanceSwitch and SixRevisions, along with many other great design blogs. If you’d like to hear more of his thoughts, I suggest you also check out his Twitter feed.

Please read on to see his answers, and to learn a little more about Usability in the design community:

An interview with Jake Rocheleau

User experience is truly the most important topic to consider because we build applications for the user. Without anybody to access the Internet our websites would empty scripts idling on a server somewhere. - Jake Rocheleau

Would you give us a brief introduction of yourself?

I’m a freelance writer and web developer out of eastern Massachusetts. I’m currently 20 years old, have been working in web design & development for about 5 years.

How did you get involved with usability/user experience/design?

I took my first class in basic HTML and web design at the age of 15. I quickly moved on to JavaScript/jQuery, CSS, and backend PHP/MySQL. This gave me the skills to build a couple web apps in my free time. This also introduced me to the world of freelancing where I began to work on a laundry list of UI design projects.

Why do you think usability and user experience are important?

User experience is truly the most important topic to consider because we build applications for the user. Without anybody to access the Internet our websites would empty scripts idling on a server somewhere. And it’s always simpler to make a good interface look pretty.

The study of building a productive user experience isn’t very tough, either. Most of the ideas are common sense processes. But it does take some practice to apply these into your own design work, for web or mobile or whatever.

Any words of wisdom to people learning about UX and usability?

Stay true to what you feel is right. You’ll always get scattered feedback from users, so take this with a grain of salt. Usability is always about the easiest and quickest route to completing a task. Keep this in mind when you design interfaces and you can’t go wrong!

Any favorite sites or resources you’d like to share?

Here are a few places I frequently visit:

What do you think?

How does this line up with your experience? Do you have any interesting insights to share? Who do you think we should interview in the future? We’d love to hear your feedback in the comments below, on Twitter @IntuitionHQ, or at Facebook.com/IntuitionHQ.

Thanks again to Jake for answering our questions, and don’t forget to subscribe to our RSS feed to follow the next in our series of interviews.

Next in our series we have an interview with Des Traynor of Intercom.io – a fantastic web app for managing relationships with people in web apps, Contrast.ie, where he blogs about a lot of things related to design and usability, and on Twitter @DesTraynor. He’s a very interesting fellow, and I suggest you have a look at those two sites – you’ll immediately see how much care they put in to developing a great user experience.

Thanks for dropping by.

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  • Jake Rocheleau

    This is fantastic I really appreciate the screen time guys. Usability in web design 100%

  • http://intuitionhq.com Jacob Creech

    Thanks Jake, much appreciated. Was great to get your view on things. Cheers!

  • http://www.uxweb.info/2011/09/28/usability-interview-jake-rocheleau/ Usability Interview: Jake Rocheleau | UXWeb.info

    [...] Jake Rocheleau, about usability, user experience and design in general. Check it out. Link – Trackbacks Posted in User experience (UX) | Permalink. ← Compared to What? Making [...]

  • http://twitter.com/joshhumble Josh Humble

    Thanks for your views, Jake. I would respectfully take issue with your comment, “You’ll always get scattered feedback from users, so take this with a grain of salt.” I’d think you would take the results of users very seriously in testing the usability of a site. This, provided proper planning, coupled with qualified users for your demographic, have been employed in the test. In addition, the preceding line, “Stay true to what you feel is right,” I feel has its limitations. After all, one who works in usability may know the ropes more so than the common person, but aren’t we building sites for the common person (or the targeted users of our client’s site)?

    Thanks for your time, Jake.